From: Ron Hays [ron@oklahomafarmreport.ccsend.com] on behalf of Ron Hays [ron@oklahomafarmreport.com]
Sent: Friday, October 07, 2011 5:47 AM
To: Hays, Ron
Subject: Oklahoma's Farm News Update
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Oklahoma's latest farm and ranch news
Your Update from Ron Hays of RON for Friday October 7, 2011
A service of Johnston Enterprises, P & K Equipment/ P & K Wind Energy and American Farmers & Ranchers Mutual Insurance Company!
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-- Agriculture Groups Call on Congress to Enact Two-Year Regulatory Moratorium
-- OSU Honors Scott Dewald, Don Scheiber and Terry Forst as 2011 Distinguished Ag Alumni
-- Expected Progeny Differences Helping Cattle Producers Make Genetic Changes
-- October Looks to be a More Attractive Month for Dusting In Wheat in Oklahoma
-- American Farm Bureau Federation Board Elects Julie Potts as Executive Vice President
-- OSU's Dr. Kim Anderson Discusses Forward Contracting- and we have your SUNUP preview
-- Broken Bow and Boise City Share Common Ground- Exceptional Drought; Rain Forecasted; and An Extra Word on Wheat Dusting
-- This Week's Legendary Restaurant- Warehouse Willy's of Poteau
-- Let's Check the Markets!

Howdy Neighbors!

Here's your morning farm news headlines from the Director of Farm Programming for the Radio Oklahoma Network, Ron Hays. We are pleased to have American Farmers & Ranchers Mutual Insurance Company as a regular sponsor of our daily update- click here to go to their AFR web site to learn more about their efforts to serve rural America!

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Agriculture Groups Call on Congress to Enact Two-Year Regulatory Moratorium
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Over 75 agricultural associations, farmer co-ops, and agribusinesses called on the chairmen and ranking members of the House and Senate agriculture committees to include, in their recommendations to the Joint Select Committee on Deficit Reduction, a two-year moratorium on all discretionary, non-essential regulatory actions that would increase the cost of food and agricultural production and processing. The request came in a letter sent to the committees this afternoon.

"Agriculture is a great American success story-our farmers, ranchers, co-ops and agribusinesses provide their fellow Americans, and consumers around the world, with abundant, safe, and affordable food, fiber and fuel. In addition, agriculture directly or indirectly employs 21 million Americans across the country," said NCFC President & CEO Chuck Conner. "In calling for this moratorium, the groups sending this letter are making their message clear-do not endanger all that agriculture has provided, and all the potential that agriculture holds, with costs imposed by regulations of doubtful necessity, effectiveness, and value."

The letter states in part, "nowing that the costs of production will not be unduly increased by non-essential policies coming out of Washington is especially important to producers now, as the Select Committee continues its work and reductions in agriculture spending remain possible. The inclusion of this regulatory moratorium in your recommendations to the Select Committee would help provide certainty to farmers, ranchers, and agribusinesses going forward."

Click here to see a copy of the letter sent by multiple ag groups


OSU Honors Scott Dewald, Don Scheiber and Terry Forst as 2011 Distinguished Ag Alumni
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Oklahomans Scott Dewald, Terry Stuart Forst and Don Schieber have been announced as the 2011 Distinguished Alumnus in Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources recipients by Oklahoma State University.

"The successes of each stand as a testament to the positive influence our graduates can and do have in their chosen career fields and in their communities," said Robert E. Whitson, vice president, dean and director of OSU's Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources. "They embody a standard of sustained excellence to be held in the highest regard."

Dewald, a native of Fargo and current resident of Dover, earned his Bachelor of Science degree in agricultural communications from Oklahoma State University in 1985, and conducted post-graduate work in speech communications and consultancy at OSU from 1987 to 1989.

Forst earned her Bachelor of Science degree in animal science from Oklahoma State University in 1976, embarking on a career that would see her earn many honors, including being named the 2007 recipient of the OSU Department of Animal Science Master Breeder Award.

A native and resident of Ponca City, Schieber earned his Bachelor of Science and Master of Science degrees in agronomy from Oklahoma State University in 1968 and 1970, respectively, and then assumed the key leadership role of superintendent of OSU's North-Central Oklahoma Agronomy Research Station, a position he held until 1973. Here in 2011, he has taken on national responsibilties as the Chairman of US Wheat Associates.

Click here for more information on all three of the DASNR Distinguished Alumni


Expected Progeny Differences Helping Cattle Producers Make Genetic Changes
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Expected Progeny Differences, most often referred to as EPDs, are a selection tool used by cattle producers to help in making directional, genetic changes in their herds. Dr. Sally Northcutt, formerly at OSU Animal Science Department, is the Associate Genetic Research Director at the American Angus Association and says it is helpful for producers that are using EPDs to have a basic understanding of their meaning and how to apply them to their herd.

EPDs are a prediction of how future progeny are expected to perform says Northcutt. EPDs can be used when comparing two animals or a particular animal to a breed but most commonly, EPDs are used when making sire selections says Northcutt.

Northcutt reminds producers they need to keep in mind that for weaning and yearling weight EPDs, producers need to determine the appropriate or optimal level in your herds. Selecting the highest or most extreme EPD within the breed is not necessarily ideal for every producer says Northcutt.

Dr. Northcutt was our latest guest on Beef Buzz - just click on the LINK below to listen to Dr. Northcutt's thoughts on basics of EPDs and how producers can utilize them in their herds.

Our Beef Buzz is a daily radio feature heard on some of the great radio stations here in the region- and a part of the Radio Oklahoma Network. We also archive Beef Buzz shows on our website- and past and present Beef Buzz updates can be found by clicking on the Beef Buzz button found on the left hand side of any page on our website- www.OklahomaFarmReport.Com

Click here for today's Beef Buzz- featuring former OSU Professor Dr. Sally Northcutt talking EPDs


October Looks to be a More Attractive Month for Dusting In Wheat in Oklahoma
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Dusting in of wheat is a common occurrence in Oklahoma but dusting in the 2011­-2012 crop will be a little different. Normally, the situation farmers face when dusting in wheat is dry topsoil with adequate subsoil moisture. If all goes as planned, the wheat will germinate when rain occurs and wheat seedlings quickly find the subsoil moisture below.

Germinating wheat seed will remain viable if it dries out early during the germination process, but once the coleoptile extends to the soil surface the plant must have sufficient moisture to continue growth or it will perish. I have not been a proponent of dusting in wheat in 2011 because we simply did not have the subsoil moisture needed to sustain a thick-­-sown wheat crop during the month of September.

October should bring cooler temperatures that will help stretch rainfall further and make dusting in wheat a more attractive option. This will not eliminate the possibility of wheat emerging and then running out of moisture, but it will lessen the probability.

Key points for dusting in wheat include:

-plant shallower than normal -­- approximately inch deep

-keep in mind that ridges formed by narrow press wheels can make the "effective planting depth" much deeper if they fill in during a heavy rainfall event

-be cautious with in-­-furrow nitrogen or potassium, as these can make it more difficult for the seed/seedling to absorb water for germination

Click here for more tips on dusting in wheat this fall


American Farm Bureau Federation Board Elects Julie Potts as Executive Vice President
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The American Farm Bureau Federation board of directors elected Julie Anna Potts executive vice president of AFBF. In her new role, Potts will lead the AFBF staff in its implementation of all programs and activities for the organization, as well as for the coordination between AFBF and its affiliated companies. She will also serve as treasurer of AFBF and its affiliates.

Since March of this year, Potts served as AFBF senior executive director for operations and development, overseeing strategic development and the operations of AFBF's Organization, Accounting and Administrative Services departments, as well as coordination of the American Farm Bureau Foundation for Agriculture and American Farm Bureau, Inc.

Potts succeeds Richard W. Newpher who retired after 19 years of service with AFBF, the last seven as executive vice president. Newpher previously worked 19 years with the Pennsylvania Farm Bureau in various capacities.

Potts first joined AFBF in 2004, serving as general counsel until 2009. In late 2009 she was named chief counsel of the Senate Agriculture Committee, serving under then-Chairman Blanche Lincoln of Arkansas. She rejoined AFBF earlier this year.

Click here for more information on AFBF's new Executive Vice President


OSU's Dr. Kim Anderson Discusses Forward Contracting- and we have your SUNUP preview
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Wheat producers are looking forward to wheat prices for the 2012 crop year with the Kansas City Board of Trade July contract being around $7.30. Dr. Kim Anderson, Oklahoma State University Grain Marketing Specialist, says that central Oklahoma basis is about $.50 less than the KCBT July contract for 2012.

Anderson says he predicts the wheat prices for 2012 to be around $6.75 per bushel for the cash price, while the July contract will be around $7.25. Even with the uncertainty in the market right now, especially with drought conditions, Anderson says he thinks the ending stocks for 2012 will be around 761 million and production to be around 2 billion bushels.

As far as planting wheat this fall, Anderson says Oklahoma and Texas are not looking very good right now with only 30% of the wheat planted in Oklahoma, which is less than the average of 50%. Texas only has 25% planted versus their average of 50%. Kansas is doing fairly well with 43% planted, which is close to their average of 47%.

Click on the LINK below to hear the rest of Lyndall Stout and Dr. Anderson's converation on the June 2012 wheat price expectations.

Click here for the audio of the conversation between Lyndall and Kim talking grain marketing strategies- plus we have details of this Saturday's SUNUP telecast


Broken Bow and Boise City Share Common Ground- Exceptional Drought; Rain Forecasted; and An Extra Word on Wheat Dusting
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Exceptional Drought increased by about three percentage points in the latest US Drought Monitor for the state of Oklahoma, with the increase being found in the southeastern corner of the state along the Red River. That means that Hugo, Idabel and Broken Bow join western Oklahoma communities with the exceptional drought designation.

Click here to see the latest graphic that depicts current drought conditions across our state.

Western Oklahoma has its best chance for rain over the next 24 to 72 hours- with the local forecast for Beaver calling for a 100% chance of rain tonight. The rest of the Oklahoma Panhandle was a fairly good shot at rainfall as well- and the western third of the main body of the state has chances of sixty percent tonight with those chances continuing very strong through Sunday. Central Oklahoma has its best shot for rainfall Saturday night and Sunday- upwards of 50% to 60% chance of rainfall- while eastern Oklahoma has at best a 20 to 30% chance in the latter part of the weekend to get this Columbus Day bonanza. Click here for a four day real time rainfall total map from the Oklahoma Mesonet- this picks up right now with some of the rains we have seen in the last day or so already as a precusor to this much bigger storm moving our way.

Finally- I know the pace has been hot and heavy in some western Oklahoma counties to get either wheat- or canola in the ground- betting that the weatherman has got this forecast for the weekend right. We got an email from our friend Clay Burtram, who lives in the Stillwater area. He dusted some wheat in with no rain in sight a couple of weeks ago- got a nice little shower and now has a pretty decent stand of wheat- he's hoping for some more rain this weekend, which he says will give him a real shot at having some wheat pasture. Click here for a picture of that dusted in wheat field that Clay shares with us this morning.


This Week's Legendary Restaurant- Warehouse Willy's of Poteau
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It is Friday- and that means its time for another Legendary Restaurant Deal- with this week's spotlight falling on Warehouse Willy's of Poteau, Oklahoma.
Warehouse Willy's began serving up delicious steaks 15 years ago. Known for their rib eyes, Warehouse Willy's is a great place to relax with friends and sit down to a great meal. Warehouse Willy's also has a variety of other dishes including their one-of-a-kind shrimp gumbo that is prepared fresh daily and for their battered, deep-fried crawfish, which are called "Mud Bugs." Starting at 8:30 AM on this Friday morning, click here to buy two $25 certificates that can be used at Warehouse Willy's for just $25. And- you can learn more about this Legendary Restaurant of Oklahoma by clicking here for a conversation that our own Karolyn Bolay had with Joy Womack of Warehouse Willy's.

Our thanks to Midwest Farms Shows, PCOM, P & K Equipment/ P & K Wind Energy, Johnston Enterprises, American Farmers & Ranchers ,One Resource Environmental- operators of FarmSPCC.Com, and KIS Futures for their support of our daily Farm News Update. For your convenience, we have our sponsors' websites linked here- just click on their name to jump to their website- check their sites out and let these folks know you appreciate the support of this daily email, as their sponsorship helps us keep this arriving in your inbox on a regular basis- FREE!

We also invite you to check out our website at the link below to check out an archive of these daily emails, audio reports and top farm news story links from around the globe.

Click here to check out WWW.OklahomaFarmReport.Com


Let's Check the Markets!
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We've had requests to include Canola prices for your convenience here- and we will be doing so on a regular basis. Current cash price for Canola is $11.30 per bushel- as of the close of business yesterday, while the 2012 New Crop contracts for Canola are now available are $11.38 per bushel- delivered to local participating elevators that are working with PCOM.

Here are some links we will leave in place on an ongoing basis- Click on the name of the report to go to that link:
Our Daily Market Wrapup from the Radio Oklahoma Network with Ed Richards and Tom Leffler- analyzing the Futures Markets from the previous Day-
Ron on RON Markets as heard on K101 mornings with cash and futures reviewed- includes where the Cash Cattle market stands, the latest Feeder Cattle Markets Etc.
Previous Day's Wheat Market Recap- A Two Pager From The Kansas City Board of Trade looks at all three US Wheat Futures Exchanges with extra info on Hard Red Winter Wheat and the why of that day's market.
Daily Oklahoma Cash Grain Prices- As Reported by the Oklahoma Dept. of Agriculture. <
The National Daily Feeder & Stocker Cattle Summary- as prepared by USDA.
The National Daily Slaughter Cattle Summary- as prepared by USDA.
Finally, Here is the Daily Volume and Price Summary from the Texas Cattle Feeders Association.



God Bless! You can reach us at the following:
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phone: 405-473-6144
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