From: Ron Hays [ron@oklahomafarmreport.ccsend.com] on behalf of Ron Hays [ronphays@cox.net]

Sent: Tuesday, November 27, 2012 5:18 AM

To: Apel, James

Subject: Oklahoma's Farm News Update

 

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We invite you to listen to us on great radio stations across the region on the Radio Oklahoma Network weekdays- if you missed this morning's Farm News - or you are in an area where you can't hear it- click here for this morning's Farm news from Ron Hays on RON.

 

 

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Today's First Look:  

Ron on RON Markets as heard on K101

mornings with cash and futures reviewed- includes where the Cash Cattle market stands, the latest Feeder Cattle Markets Etc.

 

Okla Cash Grain:  

Daily Oklahoma Cash Grain Prices- as reported by the Oklahoma Dept. of Agriculture.

 

Canola Prices:  

Cash price for canola was $10.53 per bushel- based on delivery to the Northern AG elevator in Yukon yesterday. The full listing of cash canola bids at country points in Oklahoma can now be found in the daily Oklahoma Cash Grain report- linked above.

 

Futures Wrap:  

Our Daily Market Wrapup from the Radio Oklahoma Network with Ed Richards and Tom Leffler- analyzing the Futures Markets from the previous Day.

 

KCBT Recap: 

Previous Day's Wheat Market Recap-Two Pager from the Kansas City Board of Trade looks at all three U.S. Wheat Futures Exchanges with extra info on Hard Red Winter Wheat and the why of that day's market. 

 

Feeder Cattle Recap:  

The National Daily Feeder & Stocker Cattle Summary- as prepared by USDA.

 

Slaughter Cattle Recap: 

The National Daily Slaughter Cattle Summary- as prepared by the USDA.

 

TCFA Feedlot Recap:  

Finally, here is the Daily Volume and Price Summary from the Texas Cattle Feeders Association.

 

Oklahoma's Latest Farm and Ranch News

 

Your Update from Ron Hays of RON

   Tuesday, November 27, 2012

 

 

Howdy Neighbors! 

Here is your daily Oklahoma farm and ranch news update. 
 

Featured Story:

smallgrains

The 2013 Hard Red Winter Wheat Crop Hangs On- But Just Barely as Final Weekly Crop Update is Released by NASS

 

The five states that grow the great majority of the Hard Red Winter Wheat in the US have very similar crop condition ratings for the 2013 crop as USDA wraps up their 2013 weekly crop updates for the season in most of these states.  A year ago- Oklahoma and Texas were both coming off of an historic drought season- but the wheat crop of 2012 was receiving timely rains which was helping especially the Oklahoma crop to look decent heading into the winter dormant period.  That's not the case here for the 2013 crop- and it's not just Oklahoma. Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, Oklahoma and Texas all have the great majority of the wheat crop rated in fair to very poor condition.  Only Kansas has more than a fourth of the crop rated in the good to excellent categories- at 29%. All five states have wheat crops that are VERY vulnerable to winter weather when it arrives- and all five states desperately need a long deep drink of water for their 2013 wheat crop. 

 

With very little moisture this past week, the drought continues to deepen across Oklahoma and the latest-and last-Crop Weather Report of the season shows the of small grains continuing to decline.  The potential for wheat pasture grazing is mostly gone and livestock producers are faced with dried up ponds, poor grasses and a growing need to provide supplemental feed.

 

Click here for the full Crop Progress Report from Oklahoma.

 

In Texas, conditions were marginally better, with wheat progress slightly ahead of five year averages.  Thirty-nine percent of the crop was in fair condition, 28 percent was listed in poor shape, 18 percent was in good condition, and three percent was in excellent condition.  You can read the Texas Crop Progress and Condition report by clicking here.

 

Kansas saw warm, windy, and dry weather last week, but 97 percent of the wheat crop had emerged by week's end, identical to last year but slightly ahead of the five-year average of 94 percent. The condition of the crop was 6 percent very poor, 19 percent poor, 46 percent fair, 28 percent good, and 1 percent excellent. Click here for the Kansas report. 

 

 

 

 

Sponsor Spotlight

 

We are pleased to have American Farmers & Ranchers Mutual Insurance Company as a regular sponsor of our daily update. On both the state and national levels, full-time staff members serve as a "watchdog" for family agriculture producers, mutual insurance company members and life company members. Click here to go to their AFR website to learn more about their efforts to serve rural America!  

 

We are proud to have Winfield Solutions and CROPLAN by Winfield as a sponsor of the daily email- and we are very excited to have them join us in getting information out to wheat producers and other key players in the southern plains wheat belt about the rapidly expanding winter canola production opportunities in Oklahoma.  Winfield has two "Answer Plots" that they have planted at two locations in Oklahoma featuring both wheat and canola- we have details in our latest episode of CanolaTV with Justin Stejskal- click here to take a look. Click here for more information on the CROPLAN Genetics lineup for winter canola. 

 

   

 

 

canwerebuildCan We Rebuild the Beef Cow Herd? Part 1 

 

In the first of two articles to be published in the Cow-Calf Newsletter, Derrell S. Peel, Oklahoma State University Extension Livestock Marketing Specialist, looks at the numbers to determine if America's cow herd will ever recover from its current tailspin.

That was the question posed to me by a producer in response to my recent article suggesting that two years of drought liquidation, on top of previous liquidation, has pushed the beef cattle inventory so low that we are effectively "out of cattle" in terms of our ability to maintain beef production and rebuild the cow herd. This producer specifically noted two issues that will affect the ability of the beef industry to rebuild: the loss of forage land to non-agricultural (development and recreational) uses; and the conversion of pasture to crop production. While these and other issues pose significant challenges to rebuilding the beef cow herd, I do believe there is ample capacity to rebuild the cow herd according to the demands of the market. That said, the question of how and where it will done is likely to be different in the future than in the past.

In the short run, the drought is, of course, the major factor affecting herd liquidation. Until forage conditions improve, the question of herd rebuilding is a moot one. And while there is no current indication of improving drought conditions, nor any guarantee that conditions will improve, it is likely that some regions, at least, will see improving conditions in the coming months. The more regionally specific drought in 2011 caused a 1.07 million head decrease in beef cows in a single year in Texas, Oklahoma and the surrounding states. Much of this region is still in severe drought, with some areas, such as Arkansas, in considerably worse shape in 2012 than in 2011. There has been some improvement in drought conditions in parts of east Texas but little if any herd rebuilding has taken place yet. Most all of this loss in beef cows can be recovered post-drought, though some parts of the region will take several years to fully recover.

 

To read more from Derrell Peel, please click here.

 

 

 

osuhorsejudgingOSU Horse Judging Team Wins World Championship

 

Oklahoma State University's Horse Judging Team galloped off with top honors at the 2012 AQHA World Championship in Oklahoma City on Nov. 16.

It was the third time in eight years the OSU team has earned the world champion title, with previous championships coming in 2004 and 2008. The first AQHA World Show Intercollegiate Judging Contest took place in 1979. In that time, OSU has accumulated six championship titles.

Steve Cooper, coach and associate professor of equine studies with the university's department of animal science, lauded the team members for putting in countless hours after class and making numerous personal sacrifices to compete as part of the team.

 

"I told them the night before the competition that this contest will not define who we are, it will only be an extension of what we have become throughout the course of the season, a champion," he said.  

 

You can read more about OSU's championship horse judging team by clicking here.

 

 

 

executivecommitteeelected2013 Executive Committee Elected During USFRA Annual Meeting

 

The U.S. Farmers and Ranchers Alliance (USFRA) recently held an election of officers during the USFRA Annual Meeting in New York. USFRA Board members elected by their peers to serve as the 2013 USFRA Executive Committee included:  

  • Chairman - Bob Stallman, American Farm Bureau Federation
  • Vice Chairman - Weldon Wynn, Cattlemen's Beef Board
  • Secretary - Bernard Leonard, U.S. Poultry & Egg Association
  • Treasurer - Dale Norton, National Pork Board
  • At-Large - Mike Geske, National Corn Growers Association
  • At-Large - Nancy Kavazanjian, United Soybean Board

 

The USFRA Board is comprised of 18 representatives of affiliate farmer and rancher- led organizations and agricultural industry partners.

 

For more details on the USFRA annual meeting, please click here.  

  

 

usbeefindustryleadersPasture Conditions in the Mid Section of the Country Are As Bad or Worse Than the Fall of 2011 

 

The final weekly Crop Progress reports of the season have not included a Pasture and Range rating report- as many states have not updated their pasture conditions since the end of October.

 

However, it does not take a rocket scientist to figure out that things are really bad in the middle part of the country- and in fact are a lot worse than a year ago north of Oklahoma.

 

In the case of the Oklahoma pasture ratings- we are basically in the same boat as we hit the end of November this year as we saw in 2011.  One year ago- 81% of the pasture/range land in Oklahoma was in poor to very poor condition.  Here in 2012- it's 80%.

 

Kansas is in much worse shape- 2011- the poor to very poor rating was at 62%- here in 2012- it's 82%.

 

Nebraska has not updated their pasture and range conditions since the end of October- but have reported very little rainfall during November- which means the 97% poor to very poor rating likely is still a good number- unfortunately- for that state.

 

Colorado has been updating in November- they are at 85% poor to very poor this year- in 2011, that number was 48%.

 

Only Texas is better off than a year ago- and that improvement comes because of rains in the eastern half of that state. The 2012 pasture and range poor to very poor rating is 52% this year- in 2011 as we hit the end of November- it stood at 84% poor to very poor.  

The other major beef cow state that we have not mentioned- Missouri- last reported on Pasture conditions two weeks ago- at that point they stood at 56% poor to very poor- that compares to 63% at this point in 2011- earlier this year- at the height of the midwest corn belt drought- Missouri pastures were rated 85% poor to very poor.

 

Bottom line for the beef cattle business across the heartland- it is still "hunker down and survive" mode for most ranch operations as balance stocking rates with dismal pasture conditions heading into winter. 

 

 

choiceboxedbeefChoice Boxed Beef, Finished Cattle End Last Week Higher

 

Ed Czerwien of the USDA Market News Office in Amarillo, Texas, reports the choice cut market closed the week of November 24, 2012 higher, at $196.33/cwt, about $3.30 higher than the previous week.  The spot volume was only 790 loads, low even for a holiday week. The total volume of all cuts last week was 5,593 loads.


The general trend in the finished cattle trade was mostly $2 higher on the live deals with prices at $127 to $128/cwt. Dressed deals were $3 to $4 higher last week at $200 to $201/cwt.

The average live weight from the cattle harvested in the Texas Panhandle was 1,268 pounds, about normal for the seasonal decline.

You can hear Ed Czerwien's complete weekly report by clicking here.

 

 

 

marketresearchdrivesMarket Research Helps Drive Beef Checkoff Initiatives

 

One of the functions of checkoff-funded market research is to scan the environment and look for issues and trends that can affect the marketing climate for beef. Rick McCarty, vice president of issues analysis and strategy for the National Cattlemen's Beef Association, likes to quote Michael Kami, strategic planning expert: "It's important to keep your eyes on the things you can't see." Market research helps to determine the genesis of trends and how those trends are driving consumption and affecting consumer acceptance of beef.

"We analyze how consumers are relating to beef; we analyze what they think is important in a food; and we analyze how well they think beef is performing on those attributes - taste, convenience, nutrition, safety and so forth. Are there changes in consumer's perception of beef that are good that we need to try to reinforce; are there some that are not so good that we need to work on and communicate to consumers more effectively?" McCarty says.

He says market research really helps drive all program areas of the checkoff, from culinary initiatives - do consumers know how to prepare a new product; to chefs - how would they take this new product and prepare it in the restaurant; to issues management - defending the reputation of beef.

Click here to listen to more from Rick McCarty, my guest on the latest Beef Buzz.

 

 

 

Our thanks to Midwest Farms Shows, PCOM, P & K Equipment/ P & K Wind Energy, Johnston Enterprises, American Farmers & Ranchers, CROPLAN by Winfield, KIS Futures and the Oklahoma Cattlemen's Association for their support of our daily Farm News Update. For your convenience, we have our sponsors' websites linked here- just click on their name to jump to their website- check their sites out and let these folks know you appreciate the support of this daily email, as their sponsorship helps us keep this arriving in your inbox on a regular basis- FREE!

 

We also invite you to check out our website at the link below to check out an archive of these daily emails, audio reports and top farm news story links from around the globe.

Click here to check out WWW.OklahomaFarmReport.Com 

 

 

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