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Agricultural News


Latest USDA Crop Progress Report Shows Corn And Soybean Planting Ahead of Schedule While Oklahoma Wheat Crop Deteriorates

Mon, 24 May 2021 19:50:19 CDT

Latest USDA Crop Progress Report Shows Corn And Soybean Planting Ahead of Schedule While Oklahoma Wheat Crop Deteriorates   The nationís corn and soybean farmers continue to outpace the average planting progress and Oklahomaís winter wheat condition deteriorated according to the latest USDA Crop Progress Report.

In the 18 major corn producing states, farmers have planted 90 percent of the crop with Minnesota, Iowa and Nebraska all at 95 percent or better completed.

The average for this date is 80 percent.

Approximately 64 percent of the corn crop has emerged compared to the average of 54 percent.

Same story with soybeans as farmers have planted 75 percent of the crop, compared with the average of 54 percent for this date.

Minnesota has the highest completion of 97 percent, followed by Iowa (89 percent) and Nebraska (85 percent).

Approximately 41 percent of the soybean crop has emerged compared with the average of 25 percent for this date.

Cotton producers in the 15 major producing states have planted 49 percent of their crop, compared with the average of 52 percent.

Arizona and California are about finished, and Missouri is at 85 percent complete.

Grain sorghum producers have planted 33 percent of their crop, 4 points behind normal progress.

Approximately 67 percent of the nationís winter whet is headed out, 2 points behind normal progress.

The nationís winter wheat crop is rated 47 percent good to excellent, 1 point less than a week ago.

The big changes in wheat condition have come from the major states of Kansas and Oklahoma where Kansas is now rated at 55 precent good to excellent (one percent increase) and Oklahoma has dropped to 51 percent good to excellent.

Oklahoma had the best wheat crop in the region on April 5 at 70 percent good to excellent, held steady at around 59 percent from much of May but has now dropped 8 points.

Wheat harvest has started in Texas, but cool, wet weather has delayed progress.

The nationís pasture and range conditions have improved slightly and are not rated 28 percent good to excellent compared to 25 percent last week but still well below 50 percent in this category a year ago.

The remainder of the pasture and rangeland is rated 33 percent fair and 39 percent poor to very poor.

To view the national crop progress report, click here.

Specifically for Oklahoma, the balance of the winter wheat crop is rated 36 percent fair and 13 percent poor to very poor.

The wheat is 98 percent headed and is turning ripe in many areas from central Oklahoma south and southwest.

Canola blooming reached 95 percent. Canola coloring reached 49 percent, up 6 points from the previous year but down 8 points from normal.

Oklahoma corn planted reached 60 percent, down 18 points from the previous year and down 16 points from normal.

Corn emerged reached 55 percent, unchanged from the previous year but down 7 points from normal.

Sorghum planted reached 21 percent, up 6 points from the previous year but down 7 points from normal.

Oklahoma soybeans planted reached 26 percent, down 27 points from the previous year and down 12 points from normal.

Peanuts planted reached 35 percent, up 16 points from the previous year but down 16 points from normal.

Cotton planted reached 24 percent, up 13 points from the previous year but down 4 points from normal.

The first cutting of alfalfa hay reached 22 percent, down 7 points from the previous year and down 23 points from normal.

The first cutting of other hay reached 16 percent, down 17 points from the previous year and down 13 points from normal.

Oklahoma pasture and range conditions are rated 51 percent good to excellent, 34 percent fair and 15 percent poor to very poor.

To view the Oklahoma report, click here.

In Kansas, the winter wheat crop condition is rated 55 percent good to excellent, 30 percent fair and 15 percent poor to very poor.

Winter wheat headed was 84 percent, near 81 percent last year and 85 percent for the five-year average.

Coloring was 2 percent, near 5 percent last year.

Kansas corn planted was 76 percent complete, behind 85 percent last year, and near the 80 percent average.

Corn emerged was 56 percent, near 58 percent last year and 57 percent average.

Kansas soybeans planted was 51 percent, near 50 percent last year, and ahead of 36 percent average.

Emerged was 27 percent, equal to last year, and ahead of 18 percent average.

Sorghum planted was 12 percent, near 14 percent last year and 9 percent average.

Kansas cotton planted was 39 percent, behind 50 percent last year, but ahead of 27 percent average.

Sunflowers planted was 14 percent, behind 26 percent last year, but ahead of 8 percent average.

Kansas pasture and range conditions rated 60percent good to excellent, 32 percent fair and 8 percent poor to very poor.

To view the Kansas crop progress report, click here.

In Texas, winter wheat harvested for grain reached 12 percent, down 12 points from the previous year and down 3 points from normal.

Winter wheat harvest in the Southern High Plains continued.

Small grains were cut for hay in the Northern High Plains.

Winter wheat was showing signs of freeze damage in some areas of the Cross Timbers.

Meanwhile, small grain harvest in the Blacklands and South-Central Texas was delayed due to excess moisture.

Overall, the Texas winter wheat crop is rated 25 percent good to excellent, 41 percent fair and 34 percent por to very poor.

Corn silking reached 28 percent, unchanged from the previous year and up 5 points from normal.

Cotton planted reached 40 percent, down 9 points from the previous year and down 4 points from normal.

Cotton squaring reached 5 percent, down 6 points from the previous year and down 3 points from normal.

Peanuts planted reached 21 percent, down 28 points from the previous year and down 36 points from normal.

Texas grain sorghum planted reached 75 percent, down 9 points from the previous year and down 7 points from normal.

Soybeans planted reached 66 percent, down 11 points from the previous year and down 9 points from normal.

Cotton planting progressed well in the Southern High Plains with recent precipitation.

Corn was progressing well in the Blacklands.

Cotton planting in the Edwards Plateau had begun.

Watermelons in the Southern High Plains were progressing well but could benefit from warmer temperatures.

Watermelon and cantaloupe harvest in the Lower Valley had begun.

Pecans were showing signs of freeze damage in some areas of the Cross Timbers.

Sweet corn harvest continued, and pecans were progressing well in South Texas.

Supplemental feeding continued across the state but is decreasing.

Pastures were improving in the Northern High Plains with the recent rainfall. Insects were bothering livestock in some areas of the Cross Timbers, the Blacklands, the Coastal Bend, and North East Texas.

Pasture and range conditions continued to show improvement due to recent rainfall events across most of the state and are now rated 35 percent good to excellent, 29 percent fair and 36 percent poor to very poor.

To view the Texas crop progress report, click here.


   


 

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