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Agricultural News


USDA Food Safety Tips for Cooking Thanksgiving Turkeys

Tue, 25 Nov 2014 14:40:02 CST

USDA Food Safety Tips for Cooking Thanksgiving Turkeys
Thanksgiving is the largest meal many cooks prepare each year. Getting it just right, especially the turkey, brings a fair amount of pressure whether or not a host is experienced with roasting one. The United States Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) is issuing food safety recommendations on how to properly prepare a turkey to make sure yours is both delicious and safe to serve.


"Unsafe handling and undercooking of your turkey can lead to serious foodborne illness, explains Maria Malagon, Director of Food Safety Education with USDA FSIS. "Turkeys may contain Salmonella and Campylobacter, harmful pathogens that are only destroyed by properly preparing and cooking a turkey."


Consumers should follow certain steps to reduce the risk of foodborne illness. According to Ms. Malagon, "those handling and cooking Thanksgiving meals should be aware of the resources available to them and the measures they can take to keep food safe."


Steps to follow before cooking a turkey:

-- Read labels carefully. Temperature labels show if the bird is fresh or frozen. If you plan to serve a fresh turkey, purchase it no more than two days before Thanksgiving.

-- Purchase two thermometers: a refrigerator thermometer to ensure the turkey is stored at 40 °F or slightly below and a food thermometer to make sure the cooked turkey reaches a safe 165 °F.

-- Thaw the turkey by using the microwave, the cold water method, or the refrigerator. The refrigerator method is USDA recommended.


Steps to follow when cooking a turkey:

-- Wash hands with warm water and soap for 20 seconds before touching any food to prevent the spread of many types of infection and illness.

-- Do not wash the turkey. This only spreads pathogens onto kitchen surfaces. The only way to kill bacteria that causes foodborne illness is to fully cook the turkey.

-- Keep raw turkey separated from all other foods at all times.

-- Use separate cutting boards, plates, and utensils when handling raw turkey to avoid cross-contamination. Wash items that have touched raw meat with warm soap and water, or place them in a dishwasher.

-- Cook the turkey until it reaches 165 °F, as measured by a food thermometer. Check the turkey's temperature by inserting the thermometer in three places: the thickest part of the breast, the innermost part of the thigh, and the innermost part of the wing.


Steps to follow when consuming leftover Thanksgiving food:

-- Refrigerate leftovers within two hours to prevent bacteria from growing on the food.

-- Store leftovers in shallow pans or containers to decrease cooling time. This prevents the food from spending too much time at unsafe temperatures (between 40 °F to 140 °F).

-- Do not store stuffing inside a leftover turkey. Remove the stuffing from the turkey, and refrigerate the stuffing and the meat separately.

-- Avoid consuming leftovers that have been left in the refrigerator for longer than 3 or 4 days (next Tuesday to be exact). Use the freezer to store leftovers for longer periods of time.

-- Keep leftovers in a cooler with ice or frozen gel packs if the food is traveling home with a guest who lives more than two hours away.


Consumers with more food safety questions can visit FoodSafety.gov to learn more about how to safely select, thaw and prepare a turkey. They may also call the USDA Food Safety Hotline at 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) or chat live with a food safety specialist at AskKaren.gov, available from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday, in English or Spanish.


FSIS will provide Thanksgiving food safety information during November on Twitter, @USDAFoodSafety, and on Facebook, at Facebook.com/FoodSafety.gov.


Consumers needing help on Thanksgiving Day may contact the USDA Food Safety Hotline from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Eastern Time at 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854).

   


 

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