Oklahoma Farm Report masthead graphic with wheat on the left and cattle on the right.
Howdy Neighbors!
Ron Hays, Director of Farm and Ranch Programming, Radio Oklahoma Ag Network  |  2401 Exchange Ave, Suite F, Oklahoma City, Ok 73108  |  (405) 601-9211

advertisements
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   

Agricultural News


Don't Buy Trouble - Use Common Sense When Buying Cattle to Avoid Biosecurity Risks in Your Herd

Tue, 21 Feb 2017 11:29:34 CST

Don't Buy Trouble - Use Common Sense When Buying Cattle to Avoid Biosecurity Risks in Your Herd Dr. Glenn Selk, Oklahoma State University Emeritus Extension Animal Scientist, offers herd health advice as part of the weekly series known as the "Cow Calf Corner" published electronically by Dr. Peel and Dr. Glenn Selk. Today, Dr. Selk offers some sage advice for producers about using common sense at the sale barn. Simply put, Dr. Selk recommends you "don't buy trouble."



“'Biosecurity' is a term that was used extensively after 9-11. Outbreaks of foot and mouth disease and B.S.E. in Europe had everyone in the livestock industries in America cautious.



"'Biosecurity' is actually just a fancy way of saying “common sense” as it refers to preventing disease introduction into a herd. Calf diarrhea or calf scours is a disease entity that can transported onto a cow calf ranch when common sense should intervene and help prevent the introduction of new calf scour pathogens.



"South Dakota State University researchers (W. B. Epperson. 2003 South Dakota Beef Report) examined the cause of a scours epidemic in one spring calving herd back in 2000. Results of the retrospective, record-based investigation suggested that introduction of foster calves was associated with the calf scours outbreak. Prior to April 5, no scours cases had been observed, despite 39 calves being born. The calf scours epidemic was clearly in swing by the 45th day of the spring calving season and first cases of the epidemic were observed between the 31st and 40th days (April 5, through April 14, 2000). Following April 5, records indicated there was the introduction of at least 2 foster calves. The outbreak commenced shortly after the introduction of foster calves. Foster calves can introduce pathogens to a herd, and can shed calf scours pathogens in their feces even when feces appear normal. Because of this risk, the introduction of foster calves is not usually recommended. If introduced into a herd, foster calves (with their foster dam) should be isolated from the remainder of the herd until all calves are at least 4 weeks old. At that time, it is generally regarded as safe to commingle foster calf pairs with the remainder of the herd.   



"Anytime new cattle are purchased and brought onto the ranch, biosecurity guidelines (aka: common sense) need to apply. Isolate the new animals for a period of about one month before turning them into pastures with other cattle. Visit with your local large animal veterinarian about recommended tests as well as vaccinations or parasite controls that can implemented on the new arrivals before exposing them to the remainder of the herd."




   

 

WebReadyTM Powered by WireReady® NSI

 


Top Agricultural News

  • Friday Market Wrap-Up with Justin Lewis  Fri, 25 May 2018 14:50:28 CDT
  • USDA's April 1 Cattle on Feed Report Congruent with Industry Expectations- LMIC's Jim Robb Reacts  Fri, 25 May 2018 14:44:56 CDT
  • Friday Afternoon Market Wrap-Up with Carson Horn  Fri, 25 May 2018 13:54:29 CDT
  • Emily Case of Dewey, Okla. Recognized as a Significant Woman in Agriculture by Oklahoma Ag Dept  Fri, 25 May 2018 09:54:09 CDT
  • OSU Holds Off Participation in OK's Hemp Pilot Program for 2018 Growing Season to Study It Instead  Fri, 25 May 2018 09:40:01 CDT
  • What's Consumers' "Beef" with Beef? Consumer Panel Reveals Concerning Issues of Misinformation  Fri, 25 May 2018 09:35:21 CDT
  • Atop the RON Rural Soapbox - Former Secretary John Block  Fri, 25 May 2018 07:21:43 CDT
  • Friday Preopening Market Update with Dave Lanning  Fri, 25 May 2018 07:20:24 CDT

  • More Headlines...

       

    Ron salutes our daily email sponsors!

    Livestock Exchange Oklahoma Ag Credit Oklahoma Farm Bureau National Livestock Credit P&K Equipment Stillwater Milling American Farmers & Ranchers KIS FUTURES, INC. Oklahoma Cattlemen's Association Oklahoma City Farm Show

    Search OklahomaFarmReport.com

    Find more about Weather in Oklahoma City, OK

       
       
    © 2008-2018 Oklahoma Farm Report
    Email Ron   |   Newsletter Signup   |    Current Spots   |    Program Links

    WebReady powered by WireReady® Inc.